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Should I Use Rechargeable Batteries?

September 19th, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Green Tips - (0 Comments)

We’ve all asked ourselves this question at one time or another. But do you know the answer? Let’s take a closer look at rechargeable batteries versus standard alkaline batteries to see just how they measure up.

How are they different from regular alkaline batteries? How do they work?

A rechargeable battery is a battery that can be recharged and used many times. It is also known as a storage battery, as it has the ability to accumulate and store energy. Rechargeable batteries come in many sizes and types. NiMH is a common type, so we’ll take a look at how they work specifically.

Rechargeable nickel-metal hydride batteries, or NiMH batteries, work in very much the same way its more common disposable counterpart does. However, NiMH batteries use a combination of nickel oxyhydroxide positive electrodes (NiOOH) and hydrogen-absorbing negative electrodes instead of cadmium or other, more harmful materials. A NiMH battery can have 2-3 times the capacity of cheaper batteries of the same capacity.

Should I Use Rechargeable Batteries? {The Dirt on Green}

Where do my disposable batteries go and are they harmful to the environment?

Unfortunately, the jury is out on this one. Unless you live in California (where recycling of all types of batteries is required due to the potential toxicity of their components), they probably end up in the landfill. If they do get recycled, they will, in all likelihood, get turned into rebar or angle iron.

Are rechargeable batteries really cost effective?

According to one journalist, after just a few charges the rechargeable batteries will pay for themselves! That’s quite a bit of savings – as much as $100 or more each year depending on how many batteries you typically use. If you’ve got kids, digital cameras or a myriad of other things – you probably use a lot.

So where do I get good quality rechargeable batteries?

At EnergyEarth, we have your rechargeable battery needs covered. Just a few clicks and you’ll be well on your way to saving money and energy for years to come.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

http://humantouchofchemistry.com/how-do-rechargeable-batteries-work.htm

http://www.opb.org/news/blog/ecotrope/what-happens-to-recycled-batteries/

We all know rechargeable batteries are better for the environment. But most of the time, it’s so much easier just to pick up a pack of the least expensive single-use batteries at the corner store when we need them. Did you know that rechargeable batteries cost significantly less overall and have a much lower environmental impact than disposable batteries? While they may cost a bit more initially, these energy saving accessories can be recharged and used hundreds of times, saving you money and helping you stay green with ease.

Why Use Rechargeable Batteries? {The Dirt on Green}

How do rechargeable batteries work?

Rechargeable batteries come in many sizes and types. Since we carry only rechargeable NiMH batteries, we’ll take a look at how they work specifically.

Rechargeable nickel-metal hydride batteries, or NiMH batteries, work in very much the same way its more common disposable counterpart does. However, NiMH batteries use a combination of nickel oxyhydroxide positive electrodes (NiOOH) and hydrogen-absorbing negative electrodes instead of cadmium or other, more harmful materials. A NiMH battery can have 2-3 times the capacity of cheaper batteries of the same capacity.

Why Use Rechargeable Batteries? {The Dirt on Green}

Rayovac Platinum AA Batteries

Why should you use them?

–          You’ll save money. Like we said, rechargeable batteries may cost more initially, but they can be reused hundreds of times and last for years, costing you significantly less overall.

–          You’ll help protect the environment. All batteries contain corrosive materials and heavy metals, even rechargeable ones. The fewer batteries produced and used, the fewer that get tossed.

–          You’ll conserve natural resources. Because rechargeable batteries can be used over and over, far fewer need to be manufactured.

–          You’ll reduce waste. Since you won’t be throwing away all those single-use batteries, they won’t end up in landfills or fill up your recycle bin nearly as quickly.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Local Recycling Center

1. Recycle your light bulbs! Incandescent bulbs, CFLs and LEDs alike can be recycled. Check with your local recycling service to see if you can drop them in your curbside bin. If not, try these options:

Incandescents: Next time you make a trip to IKEA, load up your inefficient bulbs. Most stores offer incandescent light bulb recycling.

CFLs: Pick up a Veolia RecyclePak or two and ship them off to a special recycling center designed to handle them safely. Easy!

LEDs: With an average rated life of 25,000 hours, you’ll be hard-pressed to even have LEDs to recycle. But if you do, check with your local hardware store to see if they’ll accept them.

2. Start a recycling club at your school! It could actually be tons of fun, help you meet new people and help the environment.

3. Make your own reusable shopping bags and keep them in your car or a couple in your purse so you’ll have them whenever you go shopping. You can even drop off old plastic shopping bags for recycling while you’re at the grocery store.

4. Grab a couple of bins and place them somewhere convenient, such as your kitchen or home office. Get a traditional blue bin, an old trash can, a paper bag or cardboard box – whatever best fits your style – and use them!

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5. Keep old, dead batteries out of landfills with a Veolia Battery Recycling Pail. It holds up to 15lbs. and can handle any dry cell battery you can throw at it. Then, invest in some rechargeable batteries.

6. Donate old clothes, housewares, appliances and whatever you have around the house that you aren’t using anymore. You’ll give your old stuff new life and help someone in need.

7. Use food scraps instead of fertilizer on your lawn and garden with a compost bin. You’ll reduce waste and save money at the same time!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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