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Deciding on resolutions can be hard, but sticking to them can be even harder. Make resolutions that you can actually keep this year by pledging to go green with these 5 easy ideas to help you save all year long!

1. Switch Your Light Bulb

5 Easy Energy Saving New Year’s Resolutions

Replacing your light bulbs with energy efficient LEDs and CFLs is an easy change. Despite all the jokes, it takes only one person to change a light bulb — and since LEDs and CFLs last significantly longer (up to 50 times longer!) than traditional bulbs, you’ll be saving time for years down the road while drastically cutting your energy use. Order your bulbs from us and we’ll deliver them straight to your front door.

2. Eliminate Vampire Power

5 Easy Energy Saving New Year’s Resolutions

Use energy saving power strips to turn off all your electronics at once! Put your entire entertainment system or home office on a smart power strip and they’ll automatically shut off when not in use with just one click. You could cut your energy bill by around 10% — without lifting a finger!1.       Reduce Water Usage

3.       Reduce Water Usage

5 Easy Energy Saving New Year’s Resolutions

Using a water efficient shower head can save you money in more ways than one. They’re inexpensive, easy to install, and can save you up to 750 gallons a month. On top of that, they’ll save you around $120 each year in related energy costs! Smart, easy and it only takes about 5 minutes: just unscrew the old one and replace it with your new, money saving model.

4.       Weatherize Your Home

5 Easy Energy Saving New Year’s Resolutions

Keeping an airtight house is important to saving money throughout the year. Maximize your heating and cooling system by sealing cracks with caulk and foam sealant and weather stripping to stop air leaks, eliminate energy loss and prevent damage from water leaks and pest infiltration. Plus, you’ll reduce outside noise inside your home just by sealing those pesky cracks and gaps that let that noise inside.

5.       Go Eco Outside

5 Easy Energy Saving New Year’s Resolutions

There are a lot of benefits to owning a rain barrel. For one, rainwater is a relatively clean and absolutely free source of water! Why not put it to good use? Rainwater is better for lawns, gives you greater control over your water supply, can reduce area erosion and provides an excellent backup source of water in case of an emergency, just to name a few.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2014 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Savings calculations are easily found on the packages of many items, including light bulbs, appliances and many others. For example, this FEIT bulbadvertises a savings value, but how accurate are these calculations? Manufacturers make assumptions about how much your electricity costs and how many hours a day you use your light fixture. They often use national averages, but often there’s no way to tell where they are getting their numbers.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

At EnergyEarth, we also provide you with savings calculations, but we give you the option to fully customize your savings to ensure you know exactly how much you’ll save. We want to enable you to purchase the products that are exactly right for you, not just approximately.  Even if you don’t want to plug in your own numbers, you can rest assured that our numbers are based on reliable sources with the most current data available.

So what goes into our custom calculations? Some of the simplest calculations are for lighting. Let’s look again at the FEIT Dimmable LED bulb. From the product page, if you click on Custom Savings / Learn More you will see just how easy it is to input your own numbers.  Include as much or as little detail as you’d like, just keep in mind that the more information you put into the calculations, the more accurate your results will be.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

For lighting, just adjust the number of hours that you expect to use the light and how much your electricity costs – simple as that.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

At the bottom of the page you can check out the math that happens behind the scenes to arrive at the savings figures. There is no other tool on the internet that allows you to personalize your savings to this extent!

Some products require much more complex calculations; for example, these simple AM foam outlet gaskets that cost just ten cents each. These calculations must consider everything from the region where you live, to the size of your house and the number of outlets on exterior walls. We have included conservative estimates for all of the variables and with just a few clicks you can customize any or all of them.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

Adjust the custom savings on a showerhead like the Bronze 3 Function Showerhead and you can see that if you shower for 10 minutes a day, you’ll save $368 over the life of the product! Check out the custom savings calculations to see how much you can save in your home today.

At EnergyEarth, we do our best to empower you to make the best decisions about how to invest your energy savings dollars on every product you purchase from us.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Does Green Need to Cost More?

December 3rd, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Green Tips - (0 Comments)

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

No, It Doesn’t.

Too often going green is thought of as a choice made by only hippies or the wealthy. The good news is that going green doesn’t mean you have to drive a hybrid car or shop at a fancy health food store in your organic cotton, fair trade Recycle or Bust! t-shirt.

Think for a moment about the original green advocates: your grandparents or great grandparents. Living in the shadow of the Great Depression, they were incredibly frugal – which coincided perfectly with green.  So many of the things they did to save water, electricity and money make great lessons for us today.

Change a Few Habits and Think Long Term

The key is to recycle, reuse, upcycle and reduce waste in every area of your life – not just your plastic bottles and junk mail. There are plenty of free and inexpensive ways to go green all around you.

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Water

The least expensive way to reduce water consumption is through better habits!

–          Don’t let it run!

–          Stop leaks

–          Don’t over water gardens and lawns

–          Use less hot water

–          Find out where your water comes from

A small investment in a few simple devices will save you in the long term.

–          Faucet aerators

–          Low flow shower heads

–          Rain barrels (see our previous article about how much they can save you!)

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Electricity

The best way to use less electricity is by changing your habits!

–          Turn off your lights when they’re not in use

–          Turn off devices when not in use

–          Adjust your thermostat

Plus, get a few helpful devices. A small investment upfront will save you in the long term.

–          Motion control light switches

–          Energy efficient lighting

–          Smart power switches

–          Improve insulation

–          Programmable thermostats

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Upcycling

–          Reuse old clothes

–          Find new purposes for forgotten items

–          Donate unwanted items to a local charity

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Real Estate

Green building doesn’t need to cost more.

–          Going green actually increases real estate value

–          ENERGY STAR® certification can increase your home’s market value

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

More Ways to Save

–          Grow some of your own food

–          Hang dry your clothes

–          Make your own green cleaning products

–          Drink your tap water instead of buying bottles

–          Increase your fuel efficiency

What’s your favorite way to save? Tell us in the comments!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Why Energy Efficiency is Important

The average household spends more than $2,200 each year on energy bills – that’s a big portion of each paycheck. We rely on electricity to power lights, appliances and other electronics every day. As we use more electricity, naturally, our electric bills rise. In turn, fossil-fueled power plants not only generate more electricity, but also create more pollution. The continued reliance on and depletion of fossil-fuel resources threatens the earth’s sustainability, not to mention our wallets’ in these tough economic times. Products such as green lighting, energy saving power strips, energy monitoring devices and programmable thermostats (just to name a few) protect the Earth’s precious resources while saving you money.

Legislation in the US

Legislation that leads to energy efficiency is tricky business. It needs to save energy and preserve or create jobs, all while making economic sense. Since some of these things can often be mutually exclusive, it’s no surprise that the most recent legislation (2009) is the first to hit the Senate in over sixteen years.

How Legislation Affects Energy Efficiency: Rebates and Tax Incentives {The Dirt on Green}

History

  • The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 established programs to promote energy conservation in federal buildings and major U.S. industries.
  • The Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1976 went one step further by including incentives for conservation and renewable energy, providing loan guarantees for energy conservation in public and commercial buildings and authorizing a weatherization program for low-income housing.
  • The Warner Amendment of 1983 allocated oil overcharge funds (also known as Petroleum Violation Escrow or PVE funds) to state energy programs, becoming quite substantial  in 1986 when Exxon and Stripper Well settlements added more than $4 billion.
  • The State Energy Efficiency Programs Improvement Act of 1990 encouraged states to undertake activities designed to improve efficiency and stimulate investment in and use of alternative energy technologies.
  • The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 allowed Department of Energy funding to be used to finance revolving funds for energy efficiency improvements in state and local government buildings because of the crucial role they play in regulating energy industries and promoting new energy technologies. The EPAct also expanded the policy development and technology deployment role for the states.
  • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided $3.1 billion for State Energy Program formula grants with no matching fund requirements.

How Legislation Affects Energy Efficiency: Rebates and Tax Incentives {The Dirt on Green}

Current

Electric utility energy efficiency programs have grown continuously and rapidly, totaling $4.6 billion in 2010.

Coming Soon

The Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act is meant to spur the use of energy efficiency technologies in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors by bringing together many energy efficiency measures, like improving building codes, efficient products incentives and research and development funding for energy efficient technologies.

How Legislation Affects Energy Efficiency: Rebates and Tax Incentives {The Dirt on Green}

Where Do I Find Information About Tax Incentives and Rebates?

Here are a few of our favorite databases for finding tax rebates and incentives:

Or, look for rebates and incentives by state (we’re still compiling this list, so if you don’t see your state or power provider, check the above links):

Arizona

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Washington

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Do you know of any we missed? Include a link in the comments and we’ll add it to the list!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/wip/sep_history.html

http://www.meede.org/wp-content/uploads/01.2013_The-History-of-Energy-Efficiency.pdf

http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/2013/1309_An_Energy_Efficiency_Primer_For_Governors_Paper.pdf

http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/downloads/2012_ENERGY_STAR_Summary_of_Lighting_Programs.pdf

Why is Recycling CFLs Important?

Recycling compact fluorescent light bulbs prevents the release of mercury into the environment. CFLs and other fluorescent bulbs can break when thrown into a dumpster, garbage can or landfill.

On top of that, almost all of the materials in CFLs can be reused, including the glass, metals and other materials that make up fluorescent lights.

How Do I Recycle My Old CFL Bulbs? {The Dirt on Green}

Recycling CFLs is not only better for the environment, some state and local jurisdictions require it. Simply contact your local waste collection agency to find out if you live in a city, county or state that requires you to recycle fluorescent bulbs. While we don’t have an exhaustive list, we do know that the following states prohibit mercury-containing light bulbs from being thrown in the trash:

Where and How Can I Recycle CFLs?

How Do I Recycle My Old CFL Bulbs? {The Dirt on Green}

Make an Informed Decision.

Mail-back services are the easiest choice to make when recycling CFLs. Prepaid boxes from Veolia work all of the time, every time and can be mailed back any time, whenever you’re ready.

Visit Earth911 to find collection schedules or drop-off locations in your area. When making your decision about what choice is best for you, note that waste collection agencies:

  • Are usually free, while some charge a fee to handle hazardous materials
  • Sometimes collect household hazardous materials only once or twice a year
  • May also collect paints, pesticides, cleaning supplies or batteries
  • Usually accept waste from residents only – not small businesses

Many hardware supply stores and other retailers offer in-store recycling. Make sure you check directly with the store before you go; not all stores in regional or nationwide chains may be equipped to recycle.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

http://www2.epa.gov/cfl/recycling-and-disposal-after-cfl-burns-out#important

http://www2.epa.gov/cfl/recycling-and-disposal-after-cfl-burns-out#whererecycle

So you’ve decided to make the switch to energy efficient lighting? Don’t stress – the EnergyEarth Bulb Selector is here to help.

There are several things to consider once you’ve decided to switch to more energy efficient light bulbs. The EnergyEarth Bulb Selector is a great way to learn about lighting and decide which bulb is right for you.

Bulb Type

The first question many people ask is “Which type of bulb should I buy?” The good news is that if you’re switching from incandescent bulbs, you’ll notice significant savings by switching to either CFLs or LEDs.

While LEDs are the best long term investment, you may decide to take the intermediate step to a CFL. There are CFL and LED bulbs for every light fixture and preference, but if your budget allows, LEDs will save you the most money over the life of the bulb. This is in part because they will last so much longer than CFLs and incandescent bulbs. You don’t need to worry about trusting the manufacturer’s claims since at EnergyEarth you’ll get our 4everLED Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Brightness

CFLs convert energy to light about 75% more efficiently than incandescents – that’s why they don’t get scorching hot like the old type of light bulb. LEDs are even more efficient and stay cool during operation. That’s why it’s important to start thinking about the brightness of your light in terms of lumens, not watts. Since a 60 watt incandescent produces about 800 lumens of light, you want to replace it with a CFL or LED that produces 800 lumens. They only use 14 watts and 12 watts of electricity respectively!

Which Light Bulb is the Right One for Me? - The EnergyEarth Bulb Selector

Color

Once you decide the type of bulb and the brightness (lumens) you want, you’ll need to figure out which bulb will best mimic the light from your incandescent.

Incandescent bulbs emit a yellowish or warm light.  This description refers to the color of the light.  Unfortunately, the convention for measuring the color can be unfamiliar to many of us.  The good news is that even if you don’t want to bother understanding this part, you can go to the Bulb Selector straight away and we’ll help you narrow down your choices.  Here are the basics:

  • Light color is measured using a unit called Kelvin (K) and is also called “color temperature”.
  • Lower Kelvin numbers mean the light will be more yellow; as the Kelvin numbers get higher, the light will appear whiter, then indicating a blue appearance.
  • The color temperature of incandescent bulbs is within 2700-3000 Kelvin
  • The color temperature of daylight is near the highest end of the scale (6500K)

Which Light Bulb is the Right One for Me? - The EnergyEarth Bulb Selector

What about my fixtures?

Do you have a decorative fixture, recessed can, ceiling fan or something else? It doesn’t get easier than the Bulb Selector.  You can browse through the fixture type and see the color temperatures available for each type of light fixture at a glance. Once you narrow your search by fixture type and color, you can easily find an efficient bulb with the equivalent brightness.

Which Light Bulb is the Right One for Me? - The EnergyEarth Bulb Selector

Making the switch shouldn’t be hard. We’re here to help you save money and energy every step of the way.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

CFLs: Savings in a Twist!

October 1st, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Ask the Expert - (1 Comments)

Compact fluorescent light bulbs – to switch or not to switch?

You’ve heard that CFL bulbs can save you money, provide the same light as incandescent bulbs and need to be disposed of properly. But do you know how? Let’s find out!

CFLs: Savings in a Twist! {The Dirt on Green}

How do they work?

CFLs use a completely different technology than traditional incandescent bulbs. Instead of an electric current running through a metal wire, an electric current is transmitted through an internal ballast and into a tube containing argon and trace amounts of mercury vapor. These elements then emit UV rays, which energize the fluorescent (phosphor) coating on the inside of the tube, releasing visible light. The initial illumination uses slightly more energy than an incandescent bulb so a slight flicker can sometimes be seen as the bulb warms up (this typically takes 30 seconds to 3 minutes to complete, depending on the bulb); however, the energy needed for continued operation is significantly lower.

CFLs with decorative covers like globe or reflector shapes have a unique design challenge and often have a slightly slower warm up time, meaning that they take longer than bare spirals to reach full brightness.

Older CFLs used large and heavy magnetic ballasts that caused a buzzing noise in some bulbs. Most CFLs today — and all ENERGY STAR qualified CFLs — use electronic ballasts, which do not buzz or hum.

How do they save me money and how much?

Since CFLs use about 75% less energy to produce the same amount of light as the equivalent incandescent, your savings on just one light fixture can amount to as much as $58 or more over the life of the bulb.

Furthermore, since CFL bulbs last about 10,000 hours, 10 times as long as an incandescent bulb, you won’t need to replace it as often – saving you money and the hassle of replacing light bulbs frequently.

Do they really provide the same amount of light?

Yes, if you choose the right bulb. The old way of buying bulbs – watts – simply lets you know how much electricity a bulb uses. Instead, shop for the amount of light output, also known as lumens.  A quick look at our Bulb Selector will provide you with all the information you need!

CFLs: Savings in a Twist! {The Dirt on Green}

Have incandescent bulbs really been banned?

No, but new standards are phasing out inefficient light bulbs over an eight year period ending in 2020.

How do I dispose of CFL bulbs?

Safe disposal of CFLs is actually quite easy. CFLs do contain trace amounts of mercury (about 4 milligrams, or less than 100th of the amount in a mercury thermometer), so they should not be thrown in the trash where they can be broken. Instead, many areas provide curbside collection of CFLs or central recycling locations. If this is not available in your area, we offer several mail-back CFL recycling boxes.

To put this in perspective, check out these other products you probably have around your home that also contain mercury:

 – Watch battery – up to 25 milligrams

 – Thermometer – up to 2 grams

 – Tilt thermostat – up to 3 grams

If a CFL is accidentally broken in your home, you should immediately pick up every visible piece of glass, carefully wrap it in paper and stow it in an airtight plastic bag or sealed glass jar until you can take it to a suitable drop off location (as listed above). Additionally, you should vacuum area carpeting or rugs to pick up glass pieces too small to see and discard the vacuum’s bag. To really play it safe, ventilate the room so that any residual gas from missed shards of glass won’t accumulate in the room.

A little wary of CFLs? Want to save more?

LED lights are the next step in savings. LEDs are even more efficient at converting electricity to light than CFLs and they don’t contain any mercury or need special disposal. On top of that, LEDs have gotten significantly cheaper in recent years – some as low as $10! For more information on LED lighting, check out our previous blog posts on LED bulbs.

—The EnergyEarth Team

©2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

Yadong Li and Li Jin. Environmental Engineering Science. October 2011, 28(10): 687-691. doi:10.1089/ees.2011.0027.

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=cfls.pr_cfls_about#how_work

http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/cfl-mercury2.htm

Need a Creative Boost? Hit the Dimmer Switch and Purchase CFL Lights.

 

One more reason to add a light dimmer switch to your home or office – a recent study published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology finds dark rooms may improve creativity.

When someone enters a room, he or she receives visual cues as to how to behave and appear. In turn, they must decide whether to behave as if in an open and welcoming environment or a confining one.

According to findings, dark rooms promote a more global perspective, which can enhance creativity.

That’s not surprising since previous research has shown soft light is often relaxing (that’s why you love to work from the coffee shop down the street) and makes people feel safe. Such environments can also make them more apt to take risks – from writing harsh reviews online to hugging a stranger – because they don’t feel they are being watched or under pressure to act a certain way.

Two researchers based in Germany, Anna Steidle and Lioba Werth, used six experiments to observe different aspects of creativity. The first three studies primed participants by having them describe a dark or bright environment or do a word search where the words were related to one of two illuminations. From there, creativity was measured by an imagination task, an alternative-use game or a speed-accuracy test.

LED Lights - Need a Creative Boost? Hit the Dimmer Switch.

Priming dark conditions induces a risky, more explorative behavior, leading to creativity, Steidle concluded. But to generalize it, she and her partner had to use actual lighting variations.

In the fourth study, subjects were placed in one of three types of rooms: dim, bright, or a control room, where the light was at the level recommended level for offices. Participants sat in the room for fifteen minutes before beginning a creative logic task, which was then followed by a self-evaluation of how comfortable they had felt.

Turns out the dimmer rooms promoted more insight problem-solving, as well as higher levels of comfort among the participants.

There was one caveat: The researchers noted dim light didn’t promote creativity if the participants felt inhibited. And dimmer light might hinder analytical, logical tasks.

If you want to design a creative workspace, consider grabbing a dimmer light switch or two, CFL lights and dimmable bulbs, and adding plants and windows. Also, don’t forget to check in with everyone in the office to make sure they feel comfortable as well.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Via Inc.com

Let Light Bulbs Dream

July 4th, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Green Tips - (0 Comments)

Let Light Bulbs Dream {The Dirt on Green}

 

Design company Hudson-Powell created this endearing poster, encouraging us to show light bulbs a bit of compassion and turn them off when not in use.

Simply can’t seem to remember to flip that switch off? Check out these energy saving lighting controls that will help you save money and energy without a second thought.

Love the poster? Buy it here. All proceeds go to Do the Green Thing, a non-profit organization that aims to inspire people to lead a greener life.

—The EnergyEarth Team

Via Do the Green Thing.

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen

June 11th, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Green Tips - (0 Comments)

1. Install a low flow faucet aerator. Faucet aerators not only reduce water consumption, they’ll save you around $50 each year in related energy costs.

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

2. Check your refrigerator and freezer’s temperatures with a refrigerator thermometer or an eco-friendly temperature card. Setting your refrigerator and freezer at the best temperature is essential – a fridge that is 10°F (5°C) degrees colder than necessary uses 25% more energy. Refrigerators should be kept between 35°F (1°C) and 38F (3°C), freezers at 0°F (-17°C).

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green} 7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

3. Go natural with dish soaps and kitchen cleaners. Many dish soaps and detergents are harmful, water-polluting aren’t biodegradable. Instead, choose plant-based, biodegradable soaps cleaners to wash dishes and clean counters or make your own.

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

4. Change out your overhead lighting for LED lights and CFL bulbs. Highly efficient lighting goes beyond selecting the right light bulb. A wide range of energy saving light bulbs, fixtures and accessories can make any space beautiful and efficient.

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

5. Keep a water pitcher in your fridge. Kick the water bottle and for cool, clean tap water (if the water in your area is safe to drink) without having to run the sink to let the water run cold. You’ll save plastic and money. Fancy it up with a few citrus wedges or cucumber slices.

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

6. Monitor your appliances. Energy monitoring devices provide clear data on where electricity goes, how efficiently it’s used and what the costs are. A monitor isn’t a substitute for your electricity bill; however, it can provide a good indication of how much a particular appliance is costing you. 

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

7. Invest in quality reusable food storage containers. You’ll save by keeping food fresher longer and using less disposable packaging like plastic wrap and tin foil! 

7 Tips to Green Your Kitchen {The Dirt on Green}

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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