Energy saving products & green living
Header

LEDs are the most efficient choice for lighting your home, office, or anywhere you need light, indoors or out. And they come in every style!

Decorative and Dimmable LED Bulbs (Specialty LEDs)

Decorative bulbs can outfit your beautiful, decorative fixtures with your choice of LED lights that will look just like any other candelabra bulb. The Feit LED 3.5 watt clear flame tip bulb gives off an inviting, warm white light and replaces your 15 watt incandescent candelabra bulbs. You can save over $25 over the life of each bulb. Have a chandelier with six lights in it? You could save over $150 on that one fixture!

Decorative and Dimmable LED Bulbs (Specialty LEDs)

If you have a light fixture with a higher profile and you want a little more light per bulb, the MaxLite Candelabra 2.2 watt LED will also give off a warm white light while replacing your 25 watt incandescent bulb and save you a whopping $140 per bulb over its lifetime (that’s $840 for a six bulb fixture)!

Decorative and Dimmable LED Bulbs (Specialty LEDs)

Dimmable bulbs are available in nearly every light output and shape. We have nearly 50 dimmable LEDs backed with our 4everLED guarantee! Choose from light bulbs ranging from warm white light (2700k) to cool white light (4100k) and a brightness equivalent to 15 – 120 watt incandescent bulbs.

Decorative and Dimmable LED Bulbs (Specialty LEDs)

Dimmable LEDs may not work as intended with a typical dimmer switch (sometimes known as a legacy dimmer switch) because of the drastic difference in their design. For the best results and the most savings, purchase an energy efficient dimmer switch rated for use with dimmable CFL and LED bulbs.

With prices like ours, there’s no reason to wait to switch to LEDs. Make the switch and start saving today!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2014 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/improvement/electrical-plumbing/how-to-use-a-dimmer-switch-with-cfls-and-leds-15882096

Fireplaces look great and can make a room seem cozy and inviting. Unfortunately, most fireplaces are so poorly designed that they end up wasting energy rather than providing heat. Any time you waste energy, you waste money, too. You can improve fireplace efficiency and save money in the process by following the tips below.

How to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Fireplace {The Dirt on Green}

Install an insert – An insert is essentially a metal box that fits tightly inside the fireplace space to reduce drafts and radiate heat. Some models feature variable speed blowers that send heated air back into the room. Glass doors on the insert let the fire shine through and emit additional heat as well. Inserts may burn wood, but they may also burn gas or pellets. Pellets, made from recycled wood waste, dried corn, sunflower seeds, or other bio fuel, are fed through a hopper to maintain a steady flow of fuel. Some inserts resemble a wood-burning stove, and feature a shelf that gets hot enough to boil a kettle full of water. NOTE: When choosing an insert, select a model approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Not only will it be highly energy efficient, but an EPA-certified insert will reduce the air pollution associated with conventional wood-burning stoves or fireplaces. Inserts are best installed by a professional.

Add doors – If it’s not possible to install an insert, add doors to the fireplace to help seal off drafts when the fireplace isn’t being used and to add a measure of safety when the fire is burning. Doors made from ceramic glass will radiate heat back into the room but still let the fire inside shine through.

Replace the grate that the wood sits on – Often, the wood in a fireplace sits on a metal grate that just props the wood up. Grates with blowers on the bottom send heated air back into the room; those made of C-shaped metal tubes draw in cool air, heat it, and circulate it back out.

How to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Fireplace {The Dirt on Green}

Add a Fireback – Put a metal plate at the back of the fireplace to protect the masonry and radiate heat back into the room when the fire dies down.

Close the damper – The damper is a metal plate inside the chimney that can be adjusted to let air into the fireplace and smoke out. Whenever the fireplace is not being used, close the damper to prevent hot air in the room from getting sucked up the chimney.

Better yet, seal up the damper – Because dampers warp over time, even when they’re closed, the fireplace may still be drafty. The Fireplace Draftstopper is an inflatable, tight-sealing chimney damper made from a rectangle of polyurethane that fits in the fireplace just below the damper level (not up inside the chimney). It can be easily removed before a fire is lit, then re-installed after the fireplace has cooled. It has been extensively tested for safety; in case you accidentally start a fire without first removing the Draftstopper, the product will melt, then drop down and smother the fire.

How to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Fireplace {The Dirt on Green}

Similarly, the Chimney Balloon, also known as a Chimney Pillow, is an inflatable tight-sealing chimney damper made of 3-ply poly plastic that stops uncontrolled air leaks. Install the inflatable chimney plug by holding it in place in the chimney while you inflate it with air. Before you start your next fire, open the tap on the handle to deflate it within seconds for easy removal. The inflation valve has a bright red card at its end that will hang down into the opening of the fireplace to help you remember that the Chimney Balloon is in place.

How to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Fireplace {The Dirt on Green}

Use dry wood – Dry wood burns much hotter than wood that is moist or wet. Plus, dry wood creates far less smoke than wood that contains a lot of moisture. If you’re buying wood, make sure it is seasoned rather than “green” and keep it covered to protect it from rain and snow. If you cut your own wood, give it enough time to dry out before you use it.

Burn hardwood – Hardwoods burn longer and hotter than soft woods. Ironwood, rock elm, hickory, oak, sugar maple, beech, yellow birch and ash are some hardwoods to consider. Softer, less desirable firewood includes balsam, spruce, basswood, pine, poplar, hemlock, red alder, white birch and Douglas fir.

How to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Fireplace {The Dirt on Green}

Remember that, whether you’re using a fireplace or a wood burning stove, it’s important to put safety first. Never leave a fire unattended, especially if curious children are about. Close the doors to the fireplace to reduce the likelihood that fiery logs will fall off the grate and into the room. Burning wood leaves a residue on the inside of the chimney that can build up and catch fire. As a general safety precaution, whether you have a fireplace or a wood burning stove, be sure to get a professional chimney sweep to clean out the creosote at least once a year.

About the Author:

Diane MacEachern

Diane MacEachern is a best-selling author, award-winning eco entrepreneur and the founder of Big Green Purse, where she writes the popular Big Green Purse blog. Diane also stays busy as a keynote speaker and her columns and articles have been published in the Washington Post, Huffington Post, Baltimore Sun and other notable publications and websites. Follow Diane on Twitter at @DianeMacEachern and on Facebook dianemaceachern1.

 

 

 

 

© 2014 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Disclaimer: The views, opinions and positions expressed within this guest post are those of the author alone and do not represent those of EnergyEarth. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. 

Low flow shower heads are one of the easiest ways to save money in your home.  Water saving shower heads not only reduce water consumption, they can save you over $100 each year in related energy costs.

Showering is one of the main uses of water inside your home, comprising approximately 17% of annual residential indoor water use in the United States. That’s more than 1.2 trillion gallons of water consumed each year! The WaterSense program released its final specification for shower heads in 2010 to improve the nation’s water and energy efficiency by raising consumer awareness and promoting more efficient shower heads. The intent of this specification is to help Americans find products that have met EPA’s criteria for superior water efficiency and performance.

How Do Low Flow Shower Heads Use Less Water and Maintain Pressure? {The Dirt on Green}

Water Pik EcoFlow EcoRain Shower Head

But How Does a Low Flow Shower Feel? Is There Less Pressure?

The pressure is actually the same (typically 80 psi), so it will feel just as good as a high flow shower head!

How Do Low Flow Shower Heads Use Less Water and Maintain Pressure? {The Dirt on Green}

Niagara Chrome Earth Shower Head

How Does a Low Flow Shower Head Maintain Pressure and Use Less Water?

There are two types of low flow shower heads:

  • Aerating shower heads force air into the water stream, maintaining an even and steady flow.  The extra air may reduce the temperature slightly.
  • Smaller spray nozzle shower heads do not mix the water flow with air. As a result, the water pressure may feel like it is pulsing, creating a massaging effect. They also keep water hotter than aerating shower heads because the water stream is not cooled by aeration.
How Do Low Flow Shower Heads Use Less Water and Maintain Pressure? {The Dirt on Green}

Evolve ShowerStart Roadrunner Shower Head

It’s an Easy Switch That Will Immediately Save You Money!

Switching your showerhead is easy, just unscrew the old one and replace it with your new, low flow shower head, Simple as that.

How Do Low Flow Shower Heads Use Less Water and Maintain Pressure? {The Dirt on Green}

Just look at how much water you could save in a twelve minute shower!

You could save 2,900 gallons per year by installing WaterSense labeled showerheads. Since these water savings will reduce demands on water heaters, they will also save energy. In fact, the average family could save more than 370 kilowatt hours of electricity annually – that’s enough to power a house for 13 days!

If every home in the United States installed WaterSense labeled shower heads, we could save more than $2.2 billion in water utility bills and more than 260 billion gallons of water annually! On top of that, we could avoid about $2.6 billion in energy costs for heating water. Switch today – it just makes sense.
—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2014 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Sources:

http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/docs/showerheads_finalsuppstat508.pdf

http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/products/showerheads.html

Savings calculations are easily found on the packages of many items, including light bulbs, appliances and many others. For example, this FEIT bulbadvertises a savings value, but how accurate are these calculations? Manufacturers make assumptions about how much your electricity costs and how many hours a day you use your light fixture. They often use national averages, but often there’s no way to tell where they are getting their numbers.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

At EnergyEarth, we also provide you with savings calculations, but we give you the option to fully customize your savings to ensure you know exactly how much you’ll save. We want to enable you to purchase the products that are exactly right for you, not just approximately.  Even if you don’t want to plug in your own numbers, you can rest assured that our numbers are based on reliable sources with the most current data available.

So what goes into our custom calculations? Some of the simplest calculations are for lighting. Let’s look again at the FEIT Dimmable LED bulb. From the product page, if you click on Custom Savings / Learn More you will see just how easy it is to input your own numbers.  Include as much or as little detail as you’d like, just keep in mind that the more information you put into the calculations, the more accurate your results will be.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

For lighting, just adjust the number of hours that you expect to use the light and how much your electricity costs – simple as that.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

At the bottom of the page you can check out the math that happens behind the scenes to arrive at the savings figures. There is no other tool on the internet that allows you to personalize your savings to this extent!

Some products require much more complex calculations; for example, these simple AM foam outlet gaskets that cost just ten cents each. These calculations must consider everything from the region where you live, to the size of your house and the number of outlets on exterior walls. We have included conservative estimates for all of the variables and with just a few clicks you can customize any or all of them.

All About Our Custom Savings Calculations! {The Dirt on Green}

Adjust the custom savings on a showerhead like the Bronze 3 Function Showerhead and you can see that if you shower for 10 minutes a day, you’ll save $368 over the life of the product! Check out the custom savings calculations to see how much you can save in your home today.

At EnergyEarth, we do our best to empower you to make the best decisions about how to invest your energy savings dollars on every product you purchase from us.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Upcycling furniture is green and a great way to save money! On top of that, you’ll get to decorate your house in a completely unique way. Remember before you pay full price at a mass retailer to take a closer look at what you have around the house or what’s at your local estate sale or thrift store for some great finds – we think you’ll be happy you did.

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Folding Chair Do-Over – Design for Mankind

Don’t throw out the rusty or scratched folding chairs hiding in embarrassment in your garage – remake them! A simple coat of paint and little bit of scrap fabric will make those sad seats festive again and save you big bucks over buying all new ones.

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Sewing Table into Cooler and Drink Table – Sweet C’s Designs

Turn a forgotten, old sewing table (or other random table you have shoved in the back of your storage unit) into a super functional serving table! The best part of this creative upcycle? The storage space turned into an ultra-chic drink cooler.

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Upcycled Spice Rack – The Speckled Dog

Your old spice rack can be used for countless repurposes! Something as simple as a coat of paint can turn this once-useless item into a great piece to organize anything from nail polish to books in any room of your home.

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Stockade Fence into Plant Shelf – My {Re}purposed Life

Found wood and old fencing can be turned into a seriously shabby-chic plant stand for your backyard for almost nothing. Embrace the rustic and leave it all-natural or give it a fresh coat of paint for a more updated look.

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Beautiful, Colorful Chandeliers – Addicted 2 Decorating

Breathe life into old chandelier fixtures with a couple of coats of paint in a fun color! This simple upcycle can be done in a free afternoon and refresh your whole room quickly and easily. And don’t forget to make that newly painted lighting fixture energy efficient with money saving light bulbs!

6 Ways to Upcycle Your Furniture {The Dirt on Green}

Coffee Table into Diamond Tufted Bench – Home Coming

Refresh that unused coffee table in the attic and give yourself some extra seating with this beautiful bench upcycle! And who doesn’t need more seating? Put it away when you don’t need it and pull it out when you do, this simple project is a great addition for any home.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Does Green Need to Cost More?

December 3rd, 2013 | Posted by EnergyEarth in Green Tips - (0 Comments)

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

No, It Doesn’t.

Too often going green is thought of as a choice made by only hippies or the wealthy. The good news is that going green doesn’t mean you have to drive a hybrid car or shop at a fancy health food store in your organic cotton, fair trade Recycle or Bust! t-shirt.

Think for a moment about the original green advocates: your grandparents or great grandparents. Living in the shadow of the Great Depression, they were incredibly frugal – which coincided perfectly with green.  So many of the things they did to save water, electricity and money make great lessons for us today.

Change a Few Habits and Think Long Term

The key is to recycle, reuse, upcycle and reduce waste in every area of your life – not just your plastic bottles and junk mail. There are plenty of free and inexpensive ways to go green all around you.

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Water

The least expensive way to reduce water consumption is through better habits!

–          Don’t let it run!

–          Stop leaks

–          Don’t over water gardens and lawns

–          Use less hot water

–          Find out where your water comes from

A small investment in a few simple devices will save you in the long term.

–          Faucet aerators

–          Low flow shower heads

–          Rain barrels (see our previous article about how much they can save you!)

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Electricity

The best way to use less electricity is by changing your habits!

–          Turn off your lights when they’re not in use

–          Turn off devices when not in use

–          Adjust your thermostat

Plus, get a few helpful devices. A small investment upfront will save you in the long term.

–          Motion control light switches

–          Energy efficient lighting

–          Smart power switches

–          Improve insulation

–          Programmable thermostats

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Upcycling

–          Reuse old clothes

–          Find new purposes for forgotten items

–          Donate unwanted items to a local charity

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

Save: Real Estate

Green building doesn’t need to cost more.

–          Going green actually increases real estate value

–          ENERGY STAR® certification can increase your home’s market value

Does Green Need to Cost More? {The Dirt on Green}

More Ways to Save

–          Grow some of your own food

–          Hang dry your clothes

–          Make your own green cleaning products

–          Drink your tap water instead of buying bottles

–          Increase your fuel efficiency

What’s your favorite way to save? Tell us in the comments!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

We live on the Blue Planet, yet less than 1% of Earth’s water is available for human use. Still, an average American household uses 400 gallons a day, costing well over $300 a year1. The American Waterworks Association blames persistent droughts and infrastructure upgrades for the forecast that our water bills are going to double or triple in the next 25 years.

So where does our water come from? According to the US EPA2, about 90% of Americans use municipal water, with 34% being supplied with treated groundwater and 66% supplied with surface water3. The remaining 10% of Americans get their water from domestic wells.

Ground water is considered by some to be the Nation’s most important natural resource due to our heavy reliance on it for agriculture and municipal water supplies.  Municipally treated groundwater and domestic wells typically use water that is stored in porous geologic formations called aquifers.  When it rains on land, the water that doesn’t stay on the surface soaks into the ground and may be trapped in aquifers.  While some of this important resource (30% of the world’s fresh water!) consists of that recent rainwater, much of it is called ‘fossil water’ and has taken millions of years to accumulate.  Don’t think about aquifers as flowing underground rivers though, since most of them are more like saturated sponges.

Where Household Water Comes From {The Dirt on Green}

Surface Water: Even more of our household water comes from rivers, lakes and reservoirs that hold rainwater and surface runoff until we are ready to use it. The land over which this water drains is called a watershed. These areas of land can encompass many states for large river systems. For instance, the Mississippi River watershed includes parts of 31 states and 2 Canadian provinces. The largest US reservoir, Lake Mead, gathers snow melt from Colorado, Wyoming and Utah and supplies millions of people with water in the southwestern United States.

Where Household Water Comes From {The Dirt on Green}

Water wars rage on! Since miners and settlers rushed to the dry, dry west, water diversion has been a problem. With the continual decline in Colorado River reservoirs and growing populations, it’s not getting any easier. Even in the southeast where rainwater is plentiful, Georgia and Tennessee have been arguing over their border for 200 years. A tiny one-mile strip of land could swing an estimated 1.6 billion gallons of Georgia runoff away from Tennessee and toward thirsty Atlanta4.

Where does my water come from and how do I know if it’s safe? The best way to learn about your drinking water is to contact your local utility. They can tell you about the source of the water and how they treat it.

Unless you are supplied with water by your own well, you should be supplied with a short report (consumer confidence report or drinking water quality report) from your water supplier by July 1st each year. These reports are easy to read, clearly define what they measure, and have a clear “Violation” or “Compliance” column that indicates if your water meets government standards.  Mine looks like this:

Where Household Water Comes From {The Dirt on Green}

Another option is to use this interactive map from the EPA . In all cases, once your supplier draws water from a river, reservoir or groundwater, the water is treated to meet federal and state standards established by the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Should I drink bottled water instead? About half of all bottled water may just come from someone else’s tap! There is no guarantee that it’s cleaner than tap water, and it probably doesn’t taste any different. You’re just paying for the convenience of having it packaged in that tiny bottle. Americans buy billions of gallons of bottled water each year, and according to the American Water Works Association, we are paying about $7.50 per gallon for single servings of bottled water – that’s about 2000 times the cost of tap water and twice that of gasoline!

Where Household Water Comes From {The Dirt on Green}

Do I really need to turn off the water while I brush my teeth? For those of us who live in rainy parts of the country it’s hard to imagine ever running out of water. The US Drought Monitor has an interesting tool where you can see weekly and seasonal drought predictions. I’ll admit I was shocked to see how much of our country is experiencing severe and extreme drought! Many of the states in the colored regions are implementing drought management strategies for agriculture, industry and municipal water systems.

How can I use less water and save money? You may not be surprised that the top three uses of household water in the US are toilets, washing clothes and taking showers – in that order. But did you know that the biggest savings comes from using less hot water?

Where Household Water Comes From {The Dirt on Green}

So what can you do? Americans use more household water flushing toilets than anything else. Newer toilets with a dual flush mode, like those described at EPA Watersense, do the job while allowing you to be a bit more discerning about the size of the flush. Where a new toilet isn’t feasible, you can install a simple and inexpensive toilet tank bag to reduce the size of your flush without sacrificing power.

The second highest water use is for washing clothes. Other than being more selective about what you put in the laundry basket, the best thing to do is to upgrade to an ENERGYSTAR qualified washing machine when it’s time for a new one.

If you really want to see a major savings in your water bill and your electric bill, make the switch to awater saving shower head. Since water heating can comprise more than 15% of your electric bill5, and showering is the third highest water use, you’ll see immediate results!

If you’re really serious about saving money on water and electricity, check out products like faucet aerators, outdoor water saving devices, rain barrels, water heater accessories and much more at www.energyearth.com.

— Dawn Richards of EnergyEarth

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

 Sources:

1. http://www.awwa.org/

2. http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/drinkingwater/pws/index.cfm

3. http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1344/pdf/c1344.pdf

4. http://blogs.ajc.com/atlanta-forward/2013/04/18/georgia-tennessee-water-dispute/

5. www.eia.gov

Don’t be scared of being green during the spookiest holiday of the year! We have the tips you need to stay sustainable and save money this Halloween.

Ghouls, Ghosts and Green! 5 Ways to Make Your Halloween Eco-Friendly

DIY Halloween Costume Ideas – Spoonful

Make your own costumes at home for the cutest, greenest disguises this year – no matter if you have a lot of time or just a little, there are great DIY options for every member of the family. If you simply don’t have a crafty bone in your body, try swapping costumes with friends, family and other members of your community for a fun and free option year after year!

Ghouls, Ghosts and Green! 5 Ways to Make Your Halloween Eco-Friendly

Use the Whole Pumpkin – 30 Pounds of Apples

Whether you’re making a pumpkin pie or carving a jack-o-lantern for the front porch, you can reduce food waste by using the whole pumpkin – inside and out. If you haven’t tried them before, roasted pumpkin seeds are healthy, delicious and wonderfully simple to make. Try this classic recipe or get creative and make up your own!

Ghouls, Ghosts and Green! 5 Ways to Make Your Halloween Eco-Friendly

Light the Way Efficiently —EnergyEarth

Be sure to bring along extra light while trick-or-treating. Choose LED flashlights and rechargeable batteries for the brightness and reliability you need, and the savings and efficiency you want. If you’re passing out candy, light your pathway and porch with LED bulbs in your porch fixture and solar-powered lamps along your pathway for maximum savings.

Ghouls, Ghosts and Green! 5 Ways to Make Your Halloween Eco-Friendly

Decorate Naturally – Real Simple

Whether you prefer simple and elegant or fun and funky décor, try going all-natural for unbeatable savings and sustainability. Plus, nothing beats the fun and flexibility of making your own decorations from inexpensive or free finds from everywhere – the farm stand, the grocery store or your own backyard!

Ghouls, Ghosts and Green! 5 Ways to Make Your Halloween Eco-Friendly

Skip the Highly Processed Snacks and Treats – 100 Days of Real Food

Depending on your neighborhood or community, you may be able to make your own treats and wrap them in recyclable paper. If you don’t think the parents in your area will go for that, you can still make sure to hand out healthier (without high-fructose corn syrup, chemical coloring or artificial flavoring) pre-packaged treats in eco-friendly packaging. Try checking at your local Earth Fare, Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s for tasty, affordable options.

Have a safe, happy and sustainable Halloween!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

It’s fall and cooler temperatures are just around the corner, if they haven’t already settled in your area.  So what can you do to prepare for the winter so the cold temperatures don’t take a bite out of your budget?

10 Fall Weatherization Tips to Keep the Cold Out {The Dirt on Green}

Keep the Cold Out

Did your energy audit reveal that you need better insulation? If so, prepare early so you aren’t caught off guard by the cool weather.

1. Sealing and insulating the exterior of your home — its outer walls, ceiling, windows, doors and floors — is one of the most cost effective way to improve your home’s energy efficiency and comfort. ENERGY STAR estimates that you can save up to 20% on heating and cooling costs (or up to 10% of your energy bill) just by sealing and insulating. Here are a few easy ways you can save:

  • Caulking drafty windows and door frames is a great way to eliminate the energy lost through these spaces. For hints on using rope caulk, check out our post all about what it does and how to use it. Keep in mind that rope caulk is most easily applied before it gets too cold, so you’ll want to do this right away!
  • Check under your sinks, in your bathrooms, in basements and other areas for places where pipes and vents go through the floor, wall or ceiling. If you need additional help, consider purchasing a handheld leak detector. You may have gaps that could be letting cold air in and your warm air out that you don’t even know about! These gaps are easily sealed with rope or traditional caulk.
  • Easy-to-apply weather stripping can keep drafts from coming through door jambs and window sashes.
  • Foam switch and outlet gaskets are easy to install (requiring just a screw driver!) and can eliminate leaky outlets and switches, especially on exterior walls.

10 Fall Weatherization Tips to Keep the Cold Out {The Dirt on Green}

2. Seal ducts. Sealing air ducts can dramatically improve the efficiency of a heating and cooling system. Unsealed ducts typically leak about 10-15% of the conditioned air flowing through the ducts while pulling unwanted air into the conditioned parts of your house. This creates pressure differentials, exacerbating air leak problems.

    • Adhesive sealant: Mastic fibrous sealant is used for coating thermal insulation on pipes and ducts and sealing uninsulated ducts.
    • Aluminum tape: Aluminum tape is a much more effective and long-lasting way to seal sheet metal heating ducts than duct tape. And, if you forget to seal drafts until it gets cold, aluminum tape can be applied in cold temperatures and is very tolerant of temperature extremes.
    • Duct shields: Central air conditioner draft shields and covers are an effective means of keep cold air from entering your home through air conditioning ducts during the winter than covering them with tape, blankets or cardboard or closing the louvers.

3. Prevent chimney drafts. Chimney balloons are inflatable, tight-sealing chimney dampers made of 3-ply poly plastic that stops uncontrolled air leaks.

4. Make the switch to a programmable thermostat. Never forget to adjust the thermostat while you’re away and save around the clock with these a few simple setting. For more information, check out our previous post on how to set your programmable thermostat to save the most money while staying comfortable.

5. If you need to heat a single room, consider using a space heater. A portable space heater can comfortably heat a single room quickly and without using energy to heat your entire home.

6. Clean your filters. Dirty air filters force your heating system to work harder than necessary, wasting electricity and taking longer to reach a comfortable temperature.   This is because the airflow is restricted by dust and debris caught by the filter. Can’t remember to change your filters? Install an air filter whistle to remind you that the filter is dirty and needs to be changed.

If you’re in the market for a new heating system, be sure to consider an energy efficient furnace that is ENERGY STAR qualified. Be sure to check out information on rebates available in your area, too!

10 Fall Weatherization Tips to Keep the Cold Out {The Dirt on Green}

Change Your Habits

7. Wear a sweater. For every degree you turn down your thermostat, you can save 3-5% on heating costs.

8. Turn down the thermostat when you are away. The best approach is to use a programmable thermostat.  You’ll never forget!

9. Let the sun heat your home during the day.  Open your blinds and curtains during the day and close them at sundown for insulation.

10. Is your desk or couch next to a drafty window?  First try sealing your window (see above).  If you’re still not warm enough, rearrange the room so you’re not sitting in a drafty area.

So there you have it. Weatherize your home before the cold weather moves in and save all year round!

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Don’t throw away those old, holey tshirts, jeans and sweaters – turn them into something new and useful! Upcycling old clothes saves money and helps the environment. What more reason do you need? Check out seven of our favorite DIYs below!

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Tshirt Produce Bags {The Dirt on Green}

Easy Tshirt Produce Bag – Delia Creates

Everybody buys groceries. Make the trip a little greener with these easy, almost no-sew produce bags upcycled from old tshirts! You could even color-code them for the specific loads you intend to carry in them or grab a little fabric paint to spruce them up even more.

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Boot Wallet {The Dirt on Green}

Old Cowboy Boot Wallet – Poppytalk

Even if the soles of your beloved leather boots and shoes have worn out, they can have new life! These easy, step-by-step photo instructions show how to turn otherwise useless old leather goods into a beautiful new wallet! You’ll even be able to pad it a little more with your extra savings.

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Memory Quilt {The Dirt on Green}

Old Clothes Memory Quilt – Lil Blue Boo

Turn your beloved dresses or your kids’ too small clothes into a beautiful, new blanket full of memories from your family’s best days. You can even back it with an old blanket or sheet instead of buying new fabric. Make more memories with your newly made treasure!

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Sweater Stockings {The Dirt on Green}

Christmas Stockings Made from Sweaters – Imperfect Homemaking

Good Christmas stockings can be hard to find. Turn a cozy old sweater into a truly personalized Christmas stocking in no time with this easy, DIY pattern for everyone from the sewing novice to the professional stitcher.

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Sweater Mittens {The Dirt on Green}

Sew Your Own Sweater Mittens – A Beautiful Mess

Accidentally shrink your favorite sweater in the dryer? Instead of throwing it out, keep your fingers warm and cozy this winter without spending a dime with these upcycled mittens! A few simple snips and stitches will turn even your worst laundry mistake into something fun and useful again.

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Tshirt Romper {The Dirt on Green}

Tshirt Baby Romper – The Seamery

Turn unwanted knit shirts into fun, personalized baby rompers for your baby or as a present for a baby shower. Turn too big hand-me-downs into something useful while helping the environment and saving money. Choose fun snaps on the shoulders or add a little extra stitching in a contrast color for a personalized touch.

7 Ways to Repurpose Old Clothes - Tshirt Headband {The Dirt on Green}

Braided 5 Strand Tshirt Headband – Make It & Love It

Keep yours and your little ones’ hair in check with this fun, money saving tshirt upcycle. A pair of scissors, a needle and thread, and a few extra minutes and you’ll have a whole new creation from an old, holey or stretched out tee! Staying green and looking good has never been so easy.

—The EnergyEarth Team

© 2013 Energy Earth LLC. All Rights Reserved.

AWSOM Powered